My Favorite Christmas Songs #14

“Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town,” Bruce Springsteen, 1975

Recorded live at C.W. Post College in Greenvale, New York, The Boss sounds like he’s having a ball performing this staple.  The banter between Bruce, The E Street Band, and the audience at the start adds an extra layer of fun to the song.

My Favorite Chirstmas Songs #13

“Wonderful Christmastime,” Paul McCartney, 1979

Paul McCartney has been accused of writing ‘Silly Love Songs’ by some folks.  John Lennon supposedly chastised him for writing ‘granny music’ before the Beatles’ breakup.  I unabashedly enjoy pop music myself, including this Christmas tune, and as Paul once sung: “What’s wrong with that?”

My Favorite Christmas Songs #12

“Feliz Navidad,” Jose Feliciano, 1970

While most (including myself) only know of Jose Feliciano through this Christmas staple, he has enjoyed international success for many years and was the first person to publicly perform “The Star Spangled Banner” in a non-traditional manner before Game 5 of the 1968 World Series.  I will confess to getting just a small kick out of hearing non-Spanish speakers attempt to sing it. 😉

My Favorite Christmas Songs #11

“There’s Always Tomorrow,” Janice Orenstein, 1964

Featured in the classic Rankin-Bass stop motion version of ‘Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” this song holds a special place in my heart.  I often say that some songs ‘make my eyes misty’ but to this day this one still brings a tear or two to my eye, especially if I am watching the show.

My Favorite Christmas Songs #10

“Santa Claus and His Old Lady,” Cheech and Chong, 1971

Our two favorite high guys present a more, shall I say, ‘urban’ take on Santa’s origin as Cheech tries to explain him to Chong with hilarious results.  One of the comedy duo’s best routines, and one of the few you will actually hear on the radio, even in these overly PC times.  Come on, Beto!

My Favorite Christmas Songs #9

“Do They Know It’s Christmas?” Band Aid, 1984

Recorded to raise money for Ethiopia famine relief, this song began the ‘charity single’ wave of the 1980s that reached its nadir (in the US, at least) with the release of “We Are The World” the following year.  Primarily featuring artists from Britain and Ireland, the song’s lyrics, driving bass line, and Phil Collins’ drum work make it a good listen despite the somber subject matter.